Monday, May 4, 2015

Land Run Monument

the race is on to claim their land - everyone has a flag to plant on their land - see the rabbit getting out of the way

oops lost his hat

perspective

riding in the covered wagon

crossing the river - check out the lady riding sidesaddle


The Land Run Monument - I had seen pictures of this and tried to find directions online, what I read was to go to the Bass Pro Shop, park behind the building and go down toward the water… it sounded kind of sketchy, I was imagining an alley with a dumpster etc. So we stopped at the welcome center for directions and parking for this monument as well as the OKC Memorial. The folks were so nice, saying go to Bass Pro Shops and park in the back parking lot, you can't miss the monument. And, the best part, just leave your car there all day and catch the free downtown shuttle to all the best things to see, it comes every 15 minutes. 

We put Bass Pro Shops into the GPS and sure enough, in addition to their large parking lot, there was another huge lot in the back for folks to park to see the monument. After seeing the amazing huge sculptures and walking along the canal, we went into Bass Pro Shops. We asked the nice greeter gentleman about where to catch the shuttle (right at the store door), and in addition to that info, he got a map out and told us all sorts of other things to see while here, and some things to look for at the OKC Memorial. Folks are very nice here, probably the nicest we have seen anywhere yet.

The Centennial Land Run Monument, located in downtown Oklahoma City’s Bricktown District, commemorates the opening of Indian land in Oklahoma Territory.
Designed and built by artist Paul Moore. He was born in Oklahoma City in 1957 and is a member of the Creek (Muscogee) Nation, Sweet Potato Clan.  His great grandfather participated in the Land Run of 1889. 
When complete, the sculpture-in-progress will feature 45 heroic (life and one-half size) figures of land run participants, frozen in motion as they race to claim new homesteads.
When completed, this piece of art will be one of the largest freestanding bronze sculptures in the world. It will span a distance of 365 feet in length by 36 feet in width and over 16 feet in height.

1 comment:

Linda J said...

wow--just wow!